Best of the Best 2007: Cruisers & Roadsters: American IronHorse Slammer

  • Photograph by Cordero Studios/ www.corderostudios.com.
    MV Agusta Brutale 910R. Photograph by Cordero Studios/ www.corderostudios.com.
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  • Don Williams

American IronHorse Slammer

Navigating the custom cruiser market can be more of a challenge than riding San Francisco’s Lombard Street on a high-neck chopper. At one end of the spectrum are extreme one-off machines that rarely meet legal standards for street use, and at the other end are mass-produced motorcycles that inevitably lack the panache of a truly custom cruiser.

Stepping into the breach are companies such as American IronHorse (AIH) of Fort Worth, Texas, which provides riders with the advantages of both assembly-line reliability and legality, along with the personalization one expects from a custom design. While the AIH Slammer may be considered a production vehicle—with both DOT and EPA approvals—the appearance of each bike is anything but common. Options include 50 different tank graphics, 18 basic color choices, and nine different wheels. All Slammers feature a stretched frame with a backbone that splits the tank in half, a low-profile instrument panel, a long swingarm, a hidden Progressive air suspension in the rear, and fully chromed and raked forks.

AIH offers a choice of three modified S&S Cycle fuel-injected V-twin engines of various displacements. Each delivers performance worthy of the bike’s appearance. The Slammer’s best and brutish 124 cu in engine produces 128 ft lbs of torque, cowing all but the quickest motorcycles and automobiles when the traffic light turns green and power is applied to the 300 mm rear tire.

The Slammer can halt its progress authoritatively with a pair of drilled front disc brakes clamped with six-piston calipers. The long-stroke motor also lends itself to engine braking, and a large single disc on the rear wheel—the brake of choice for less aggressive riding—also aids deceleration. With so much power on tap, superior handling is equally essential. The Slammer’s ground clearance is generous for a motorcycle of its type, making it capable in the corners. It carries its weight low, but the 21-inch front tire keeps the wide rear tire in check.

The Slammer, which is priced from $38,900 to $47,600, may be a street terror in town, but it also can be in its element at a hinterland roadhouse. After all, it is from Texas.

American IronHorse Motorcycles
www.americanironhorse.com

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