Lamborghini Gallardo LP 550-2 Valentino Balboni

    Unlike its crosstown rival, Ferrari, which merely names its factory streets after star employees, Lamborghini honors its Hall of Fame workers with a namesake limited edition. The Lamborghini Gallardo LP 550-2 Valentino Balboni bears the name of the Italian automaker’s chief factory test-driver, who began his career in Sant’Agata in 1967 and retired last year after completing work on his eponymous car. Designed to appeal to Lamborghini lovers who appreciate the traditional attributes of rear-wheel drive, the Balboni-edition Gallardo is limited to 250 units. Hitting the LP 550-2’s throttle on a straightaway spins the tires, while hitting the throttle through a corner can spin the car; unlike the standard-production Gallardo LP 560-4, which features a forgiving all-wheel drive, this baby bull is for drivers who have what it takes to make Valentino Balboni proud. 

    Pros: Comfortable enough to be considered a daily driver; fast enough to go head-to-head with the best.
    Cons: Doesn't come with the trademark Lamborghini scissor doors.

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