Robb Report Readers at the Monterey Motorsports Reunion

  • Photo © Drew Phillips
    Craig Barto racing Photo © Drew Phillips
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
    Craig Barto Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Richard Owen
    Jim Reed on track Photo © 2012 Richard Owen
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
    Jim Reed Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
    Jim Reed car Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
    Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © Drew Phillips
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Richard Owen
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Photo © 2012 Ron Avery
  • Toni Avery

Some 900 car enthusiasts applied to participate in this year’s Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion, an annual event held August 19 through 21 at the Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, Calif. The 564 participants were selected based on their car’s authenticity, provenance, and mechanical and period correctness. Among them were several Robb Report readers, including Jim Reed, president of Clarke Garvey Insurance. He has been coming to the Monterey Motorsports Reunion for 15 years, although his racing career has been much longer: 23 years, to be exact. Reed has had a passion for performance automobiles ever since he started street racing when he was a kid. 

This year, Reed is racing his 1966 Shelby GT350. The reason he chose this car, he explains, is, “At 6 feet 3 inches, I can actually fit in the car. Plus, this is the era I grew up in.” He says that at the time, an early Shelby Mustang was a good entry-level car, although they have since appreciated considerably in value. In addition to his Shelby, he has an eclectic collection that includes a 1972 Dodge Challenger, a 1965 GTO, a Jeep CJ7, a 2007 Shelby GT500, a 1967 Camaro racecar, and the “Deathmobile ” from Animal House (one of three extant).

In terms of preparing the car for competition, Reed has a mechanic who does most of the work, and prepping for the Reunion began about three months prior to the race event. Unlike many racecars, Reed’s GT350 is raced often, the Reunion being its sixth outing this year alone. Preparing for this race also requires a considerable investment. “Take the price of the car, multiply times two, and that might be what you are going to pay,” he says. If nothing breaks at the race, Reed says the average cost per race weekend (in prep) is about $4,000 to $5,000. When Reed blew an engine at another race, though, it cost nearly $30,000 to repair.

Comparing his experience in both modern and vintage racing, Reed prefers the vintage over the new, simply because modern racing is more “cut-throat.” With years of experience, he’s learned a few lessons. “Rash moves don’t work. You have to be observant.”

Craig Barto, president of Signal Hill Petroleum, was another longtime Robb Report reader participating in the race with his rare Bugatti Type 51. Racing for about 10 years, Barto also owns some contemporary performance cars, including a Porsche Carrera GT, a Porsche Turbo S Cabriolet, an Aston Martin AR1, a Mercedes-Benz SLS Roadster, and a Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen.

A significant historic racecar, the Bugatti Type 51 was developed to beat Alfa Romeo at Monaco. Bugatti took the successful Type 35 and added the advanced dual-overhead cam design by Miller to the supercharged straight-eight engine, beating the Alfas in 1931. Preparing a prewar racecar takes many hours and a dedicated crew. Barto says that while the car was in good shape when he bought it, the cost of typical race preparation can range from a few thousand dollars to nearly $60,000, which entails magnafluxing all aluminum parts and completely going through the car.

The adrenaline—and the people—is what Barto enjoys most about the sport. Along those lines, he explains one benefit to racing as “keeping history going.” To that end, he has been coming to the Reunion for about 18 years.

Besides racing, Barto and his wife, Gigi, take the Type 51 on Bugatti rallies. To Robb Report readers contemplating vintage racing or with an interest in vintage cars, Gigi says, “I would recommend all readers come to the Monterey Motorsports Reunion. It’s an unbelievable experience, and you’re really missing out if you don’t come to the races.”

From Around the Web...
Mostly a mystery at this point, the collaborative concept should materialize by 2018…
The working example features one-off componentry and the signatures of Carroll Shelby and Bill Ford…
The most iconic modern classics to hit the road with this summer…
In May, some of history’s most important bikes descended on Carmel Valley, Calif.…
Meticulously made over, the marque’s flagship model now comes in two new trim packages…
Photo by Christian Martin
A selection of 115 classics, many that competed at the famed endurance race, will roll out for sale…
Introduced today by the luxury marque, the bespoke marvel will be a driver and day planner in one…
On a full charge, the 95 hp bike can travel up to 125 miles…
The members-only track and facility comprise the only year-round playground of its kind in Canada…
The zero-emissions vehicle vaults to 90 mph and has a range of 150 miles…