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Best of the Best 2005: Fashion Accessories

William Kissel

SHIRTS 
Finamore
The second-oldest shirtmaker in Naples has extremely limited distribution in the United States and maintains a very low profile, but the anonymity of the fourth-generation family-owned company will not last. While other Italian shirt brands promise superfine fabrics and hand sewing on seams, armholes, and buttonholes, Finamore delivers all these fine points plus a number of exclusive design details. Hand-stitched and pleated shoulder inserts, for instance, endow its shirts with unsurpassed elasticity for freedom of movement, while the novelty collar designs never fail to turn heads.

 

Finamore, through Ellegi, 212.246.7034; available at Domenico Vacca, 212.759.6333

NECKWARE
Dolcepunta
Seven-fold neckwear—which is made from fabric that is folded seven times—has become the new measure of quality. But Dolcepunta designer Rolando Scapellato has surpassed the industry standard by developing the first 11-fold necktie, an achievement that is particularly impressive because he accomplished it without increasing the amount of silk, which would add weight and bulk to the tie.

Dolcepunta, through Luciano Moresco, 212.397.4300

SHOES
Salvatore Ferragamo
Shoemakers often combine rubber soles with leather uppers to enhance the comfort of dress footwear, but such constructions tend to be bulky and cumbersome. Salvatore Ferragamo, however, has developed a proprietary process that incorporates a rubber inset into the slim leather soles to combine the comfort of rubber with the appearance of leather.

Salvatore Ferragamo, 800.628.8916, www.ferragamo.com

BELTS
James Reid Ltd.
With both a silversmith workshop and a signature gallery in Santa Fe, N.M., James Reid might be perceived as simply a Western-style belt maker. Yet most of his handmade buckles—which he crafts in 14- and 18-karat gold, silver, and platinum and combines with straps made of supple leathers and exotic skins—convey a cosmopolitan blend of Italian, Art Deco, and Southwestern design motifs.

James Reid Ltd., 800.545.2056, www.jrltd.com

HOSIERY
Marcoliani
Calzificio Italiano has been knitting men’s hosiery for prestige fashion brands for more than half a century. Five years ago, the Italian sock maker developed its own label, Marcoliani, to showcase such innovations as extra-fine merino yarns made from Australian wool measuring less than 19.5 microns. Other novelties include a mercerized and twisted Egyptian cotton that feels like silk and a sumptuous new cotton/cashmere blend.

Marcoliani, www.marcoliani.com; through
International Attire, 212.957.9466

CUFF LINKS 
Henry Dunay
Henry Dunay describes his cuff links as “conservatively modern,” yet the manner in which he crafts each pair is assuredly old-fashioned. Instead of using one- or two-piece castings as most jewelers do, Dunay employs as many as 16 separate castings to create his highly complex yet deceptively simple looking gold or platinum designs. And although other designers tweak their models while still in wax form, Dunay finishes his after they have been molded in metal.

Henry Dunay, 800.888.2525, www.henrydunay.com

LEATHER GOODS
A. Testoni
While A. Testoni previously has offered leather goods to complement its world-class footwear, this year the 76-year-old Italian shoe manufacturer launched Amedeo Testoni, a collection of completely handmade bags and briefcases named for the company’s founder. The two-tone calfskin AT briefcase, limited to 52 pieces, is built with traditional Norwegian construction (consisting of two rows of stitching) for decoration as well as durability.

A. Testoni, 212.223.0909, www.testoniusa.com

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Photo by Ted Morrison