FrontRunners: Clear Shot

When billiard tables were first introduced, during the 15th century, they were covered in green felt to simulate the grassy lawns on which the game’s predecessor, croquet, was played. Australian designer Craig Nottage figured that after 600 or so years the green-felt design had become outdated—thus his $33,000 Nottage Design G-1 (www.nottagedesign.com) transparent pool table. Nottage covered the G-1’s 15 mm glass playing surface with a clear film, called Vitrik, that has play characteristics that are similar to felt’s. "I wanted to bring the age-old game into the 21st century," says Nottage. "I saw the need for a modern-style table to fit with the latest furnishings, architecture, and appliances." rel="nofollow"

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