In the Rough

    For 15 years, Todd Reed’s rough diamond-and-gold jewelry designs were considered unconventional and edgy. Now his once-unusual use of precious diamonds has emerged as an important direction in jewelry design. “I use them because each and every stone has individual and unique characteristics,” says the Boulder, Colorado-based designer. In contrast to faceted diamonds that are cut to scientific proportions to maximize a stone’s brilliance, the rough stones are valued for their unique, mysterious glow and shape. The $40,000 rough diamond-and-ruby bracelet, shown, is an example of the designer’s use of blending colors and shapes into one-of-a-kind pieces that show the gems in a less formal style. Rough diamonds are also appealing to a growing male clientele, says Reed, who’s designed a new collection of diamond cuff links and wedding bands. (303.442.6280)  

    ?Jill Newman

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