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Private Jet Specs Power by

Cessna Citation VI

Description

 

Cessna’s line of business jets, the Citations, is known for economy, reliability, and performance.  They have consistently stood out in the market since the first Citation rolled off the line in 1972.  Their major breakthrough into the private jet market came with the success of the Citation III, which won the Collier Trophy and cemented Cessna’s reputation as a serious contender in the private jet market.  The Citation VI is one of the updates for the Citation III; it is more economical both in acquisition cost and hourly operating cost. 

The interior of the Citation VI is identical to the cabin of the Citation III: it is 5.8 feet high, 5.7 feet wide, and 18.7 feet long, which total to a volume of 438 cubic feet.  The interior design is standardized in a double-club configuration.  There is an available 61 cubic feet of baggage space.  Travel in the Citation VI is fairly quiet due to its compliance with the FAR part 36 noise standards.

One of the best features of the Citation VI is that it is fast.  It was designed for optimal speed; the body utilizes lightweight composites wherever possible and smooth, bonded metal surfaces to cut down on drag.  It climbs quickly to its flight level of 43,000 feet, where it can cruise at a maximum speed of .81 to .83 Mach (468 knots).  Its maximum range with four passengers is 2,920 miles (2,054 nautical miles).  The Citation VI has the longest range and fastest overall cruise speed of any midsized jet.  

Taxiing and landings are very smooth due to the Citation VI’s trailing link landing gear.  Pilots report excellent control and smooth performance in stalls, easy landings, and very effective brakes.  The two Honeywell TFE731-3B-100S engines are extremely reliable and allow for great flexibility in flight operations.

The Honeywell digital SPZ-8000 flight control system comes standard in Citation VIs. It includes many safety checkup systems that are uncomplicated, where checking the status of many vital flight systems is literally as easy as pressing a button.  The Citation VI is certified to FAR part 25 safety standards, the same standards that commercial jets must adhere to.  Unlike the digital autopilot of the Citation III, the Citation VI uses an analog version to cut cost and weight.

In short, Cessna set out to build a private jet that would improve upon its predecessor and reduce acquisition and operating cost.  The resulting Citation VI is a low-priced business jet that delivers comfortable travel accommodations, economic operating costs, and good speed and range capabilities.