Best of the Best 2005: Colored Gemstones

  • James de Givenchy for Taffin
<< Back to Robb Report, June 2005

Chanel’s Transition necklace denotes the progression of day into evening through an ombré of sapphires ranging in color from pale sky blue to deep violet. The captivating design reflects Mlle. Chanel’s fascination with the planets, stars, and night sky—themes she often expressed in her original diamond jewelry from the 1930s that depicted stars and comets.
 
It took more than a year to acquire the gems and then assemble the Transition necklace in Chanel’s Parisian workshops. Twenty-four pear-shaped sapphires weighing more than 130 carats in total are gently suspended around the neck like large raindrops; accenting them is a singular 7-carat pear-shaped diamond centerpiece. The 18-karat white gold piece is also pavéed with 912 sapphires in varying shades of blue and 55 diamonds.

 

Chanel Fine Jewelry, 212.535.5828, www.chanel.com

High-Flying Colors

H. Stern displays irreverence to the rarity and value of the 18 large emeralds in this necklace by setting them in a decidedly casual manner with citrines, pink tourmalines, beryls, rubies, and 61 diamonds.
 
James de Givenchy for Taffin, known for his unusual and audacious mixing of colorful gems, paired elongated green tourmalines with an intense orange garnet center stone to create a strikingly modern star brooch.
 
Ricardo Bastaspent more than a year crafting this fire-breathing dragon brooch appointed with Mexican fire opals flowing from the mouth, ivory teeth and tusk, a vivid demantoid garnet eye, green sapphires, and 584 diamonds that embellish the back of the neck. 

H. Stern, 800.747.8376, www.hstern.net
James de Givenchy for Taffin, 212.794.0308
Ricardo Basta, exclusively at Jewels by Bernier in Beverly Hills, 310.278.4792

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