Robb Design Portfolio: Look Sharp

An Indian prince of the late 17th and early 18th centuries would not be caught dead without his dagger—if he had any sense of style. "Daggers were male jewelry, worn only by royals and aristocrats, and meant to catch the eye," says Peter Finer, a London-based dealer of antique arms and armor (+44.20.7839.5666, www.peterfiner.com). His holdings include these daggers, which were made in India and date from the period 1680 to 1740. Each is valued at more than $50,000.

These weapons, which feature handles carved from either jade or rock crystal, were mostly ornamental, but they could do damage: Finer says that the horse-head dagger has a reinforced steel blade that would pierce chain mail. "You can draw an analogy with people who own extremely extravagant rifles," he says. "They never shoot them, but that doesn’t mean they can’t use them."

Street photography is stepping into a thrilling new era...
“It really was a gap in art history,” Falconer says...
The April 28 sale will focus on the iconic photographer’s images of the American West…
Photo by Christie’s Images LTD.
In 2006, Bonhams London introduced an annual auction as curious as the objects it proffered. Called...
Detective Don Hrycyk has returned an estimated $121 million in stolen works to their rightful...
The Solid Fountain Pen Gold Edition’s barrel is constructed entirely from 14-karat gold…
Photo by Leslie Bird
The Oakland Athletics enjoyed a dynastic run of success in the 1970s, winning three World Series in...
Photo by he Weinstein Company
Bonhams attributes the high realized price in part to The Imitation Game, the recent film about...
Photo by Christie’s Images LTD.
King John of Saxony commissioned a young Dresden coachbuilder to create a sweet town coach...
Photo by Capital Records LLC
“American Pie” topped the Billboard charts shortly after its 1971 release...