Robb Design Portfolio: Monarch's Marque

Spain’s Alfonso XIII had a hankering for Hispano-Suizas. The king, who reigned from the time of his birth in 1886 to his exile in 1931, acquired his first model of the Spanish-financed, Swiss-engineered, and French-produced automobiles while he was a teenager. He eventually purchased nearly 30 of the vehicles, including the one shown here, the first Hispano-Suiza H6 made available to the public. Introduced in 1919 at the Paris Salon, the car carried open coachwork by Duvivier and could attain a top speed of 85 mph thanks to features that included an aero-derived, 6.5-liter inline-6 with an overhead camshaft and a crankshaft shaped from a 770-pound steel billet. A four-wheel braking system—an innovation later adopted by Rolls-Royce—brought the hefty vehicle to a halt. Following a restoration, Alfonso’s former H6 won the 2004 Alec Ulmann trophy at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

The one-off 550 Italia prototype mates a Fiat 500 body with a Ferrari 458 Italia engine…
Limited to 50 examples, the supercar features design details found on McLaren’s 1995 Le Mans–...
The global program will feature top models from Ferrari, McLaren, Porsche, and Lamborghini…
Cadillac hopes to take on its Germans competitors with its first modern full-size flagship…
Photo by Mercedes-Benz USA
The new cars expand the marque’s C-Class offerings…
The daylong event will include exhibitions, rides, and live entertainment…
A hand-embroidered silk interior, ruby-set dials, and mother-of-pearl paint set this Phantom apart...
Photo by David Dewhurst Photography
The all-new design is aimed at the hip crowd, but loyalists may balk…
Photo by 2014 Infiniti
The QX50’s size increase promises a roomy ride for passengers…
Photo by Barry Hathaway
Robb Report takes a ride and speaks with the actor, whose passion for motorcycles fueled the fire...