DBS

    The base movement of this timepiece is entirely designed and manufactured in-house by De Bethune. It consists of a 30-mm caliber with double-barrel self-adjusting offering an eight-day power reserve. Its oscillating system is placed in its own case, allowing great stabilization thanks to the new system composed of a titanium balance bridge fitted with a triple shock absorber. The original indication of the moon phase is represented by a platinum and blue-steel sphere emerging from a second dial and turning on its own axis. Additionally, the mechanism training the sphere is calculated in a way that it will take 120 years before it will shift one day. Inside Information: This timepiece is the result of more than two years of technical research, and the design is born from a suggestion made by Prince Albert of Monaco. His Highness suggested De Bethune remove the dial and reverse the position of the movement, exposing its symmetrical, arching plates.

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