The Best of the Best 2003: Art Galleries - Dickinson

James Roundell gained more than expertise in Impressionist and modern paintings during his 22 years at the London office of Christie’s. He also learned about the flaws of the auction-house approach to buying and selling art. Joining Dickinson in 1995 allowed him to be more selective in his purchases. The firm, which maintains offices in London and New York, was founded in 1993 by another Christie’s alumnus, Simon Dickinson, who spent 24 years in the Old Master and the British paintings departments. Dickinson’s staff boasts more than 150 years’ experience in art, and holdings include works by Reni, Boucher, and Monet. Its services do not end with dealing, however. A collector preparing to sell a painting by a major Impressionist artist once asked Roundell for guidance. A proposal solicited from an auction house proved unsatisfactory, so it was sold through Dickinson instead. While Roundell will not reveal the owner or the ultimate price of the work, he will say this: “We sold it privately for considerably above what the auction house estimated.”

Dickinson, +44.20.7493.0340, www.simondickinson.com

F. Scott Fitzgerald inscribed the book with a handwritten note to Harold Goldman, the man who...
The limited-edition pen pays tribute to Alexander Fleming and to the entire medical community…
Photograph courtesy of Profiles in History
His thoughts on God, relativity, and the atomic bomb are among the letters’ contents…
And, yes, it has a laser-triggered alarm…
Courtesy of Haight Street Art Center
The Yountville winery celebrates the band’s 50th anniversary…
The Parisian silversmith partnered with the interior designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard for the...
Courtesy of Profiles in History
In honor of the Star Wars holiday on May 4, we present some of the top memorabilia from the...
Scott Foraker and Babe Ruth’s Bat
Collected Scott Foraker and Babe Ruth’s Bat...
Street photography is stepping into a thrilling new era...
At the Heritage Auctions sale on April 18, fans paid big money for a little pop history…