facebook twitter pinterest instagram You Tube

The Best of the Best 2003: Dining - Taillevent

Scott Haas

Despite the formal atmosphere of Taillevent, which features Louis XVI decor and a phalanx of tuxedoed waiters, the staff of the Paris landmark conveys a genuine sense of warmth.

“Taillevent is more of a club than a restaurant,” says the restaurant’s owner, Jean-Claude Vrinat. “The word ‘customers’ is banished; visitors or friends is the correct expression.”

While other restaurants follow or create trends, history is the guiding principle at Taillevent. The kitchen does not deviate from traditional French methods of cooking, presentation, or use of ingredients. It follows strict guidelines while creating classic dishes such as boudin de homard Breton (lobster sausages), escalopes de foie de canard au Banyuls (duck livers), and filet de boeuf à la bordelaise (beef fillet in a wine sauce).

Chef Alain Solivérès started at Taillevent just last year. As he settles into his position, do not be surprised if the kitchen reaches even higher levels of gastronomical glory.

Taillevent, +33.4495.1501, www.taillevent.com

Read Next Article >>
It is fairly well settled among all but the grimmest misanthropes and most...
Las Vegas has long been defined by the blazing neon signs and often...
Photo by Ted Morrison
In the Piedmont region of Italy, where Cristiano Cremi­nelli’s family has...
Photo by Deborah Jones
Chef Thomas Keller and a coterie of fans toast the legendary restaurant’s...
While San Francisco’s Quince is temporarily closed for renovations this...
Santa Barbara County along California’s Central Coast, with its sprawling...
Seven of the world’s most influential chefs—each with a Michelin three-...
Photo by Olivier Pascaud
Alain Ducasse has redefined what it means to be a great French chef. He...
Copyright by Luc Castel
Moët & Chandon has teamed up with the Michelin three-star chef Yannick...
Photo credit Bonjwing Lee
From the briny perfection of May River oysters to the cutting-edge cuisine...