The Best of the Best 2003: Watches - Villeret, Blancpain

  • James D. Malcolmson

ts are built as integrated units for extra displays ratherDress watch fans have something to celebrate now that serious suits are back in fashion. Equally thrilling is the news that some of their all-time favorite timepieces, Blancpain’s famous ultrathins, have been completely revamped. With a new name—Villeret—the collection ($10,000 to $25,000) ranges from a model with a clean, simple dial to one with a retrograde seconds hand, proving that dress classics can be just as engaging and stylish as exotically festooned timepieces. Features such as the larger 40-millimeter case, elongated hands, and razor-thin bezel may be straightforward, but they combine to form a watch that is refined, harmonious, and even sexy.

Blancpain, in concert with its in-house movement maker Frederic Piguet, is known for its ability tocraft ultrathin movements. These calibers are just over 3 millimeters in height—extremely thin for an automatic. Even more impressive: The movemen than with layered modules, providing a purity of design on the inside to match that of the exterior.

Blancpain, 877.520.1735, www.blancpain.com

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