Snake Charmed

The technique behind the snakelike coils of Bulgari’s Serpenti watches may be older than the company itself. The tubogas technique—which involves interlinking long strips of metal around a removable form—first appeared sometime in the 19th century and remained popular until the 1940s, a period when Bulgari applied the construction to some of its early snake watches. While snakes have remained an important motif for the company, Bulgari did not use tubogas again until the 1970s. More than 30 feet of gold strips go into a double-coil Serpenti, and its flexibility makes it perfect for a woman who has no fear of bold design, or of reptiles.

Bulgari, 800.285.4274, www.bulgari.com

Thanks to its mind-blowing miniature movement, the thinnest of the new watches is less than a third...
The DB25 Quetzalcoatl’s dial features a solid-gold representation of the mythical serpent…
These watches prove that a simple design can be just as pleasing as a slew of complications…
The new timepiece has a fluid-based linear timekeeping display…
The new watch has multiple systems to ensure that its movement receives consistent power…
Computer-aided design is allowing watchmakers to push the boundaries of innovation...
The watchmaker puts its skill in guilloche and damaskeening on full display…
The two back-to-back auctions will offer hundreds of unique designs…
The new variation sports a dial crafted from a meteorite...
Photo by Didier Gourdon
The new watch has a tourbillon hidden by an automaton…