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  1. John Loring, Tiffany’s renowned design director and historian, is particularly proud that Tiffany is selling diamonds sourced in North America. “The first important diamond to be cut in America was...
  2. At a development cost of more than $941 million, the Diavik diamond mine stands as a unique testament to the extremes—and expense—to which producers will go to dig diamonds out of the ground. The...
  3. In 1848, on the eve of the fall of Louis-Philippe’s regime, two representatives from Tiffany & Co. arrived in Paris for their annual buying trip. The mini-revolution was reaching its peak, and...
  4. Over the centuries, revolution and conquest have moved more merchandise than the enterprises of Cartier, Harry Winston, and Van Cleef & Arpels combined. The history of rare gems is often a...
  5. British jewelry designer Stephen Webster (212.226.6160, www.stephenwebster.com ) knows that champagne and diamonds make a perfect match. And Dom Pérignon’s Rosé Vintage 1993, a rare champagne that...
  6. Since the 1960s, Giuseppe Picchiotti has striven to enhance the natural beauty of women with precious jewelry crafted from the finest colored gems and diamonds. Now, Picchiotti’s ( www.picchiotti.it...
  7. It took nearly five years to accumulate the harmoniously matched South Sea pearls for Tiffany’s prized necklace.
  8. “I wouldn’t reveal my techniques, even if I were tortured,” says Italian jewelry designer Orlando Orlandini, while his face beams with a characteristically warm and embracing smile. He is only half...
  9. When Vhernier introduced its jewelry at New York’s Bergdorf Goodman in March, even the store’s most urbane clientele could not help but take notice of the colorful, innovative, and daring new designs...
  10. When you think of James Robinson (212.752.6166, www.jrobinson.com )—a 91-year-old New York antiques shop specializing in 18th-, 19th-, and early-20th-century silver, porcelain, and glassware—the term...

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