Artist Robert De Niro Sr.’s Art on Display in New York

  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
    Robert De Niro, Sr., Autumn Landscape, 1968. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
    Robert De Niro, Sr., Autumn Landscape (detail), 1968. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
    Robert De Niro, Sr., Last Painting, 1985-1993. Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in. Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
    Robert De Niro, Sr., Last Painting (detail), 1985-1993. Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 in. Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Photo Courtesy DC Moore Gallery, New York
  • Sheila Gibson Stoodley

For its first exhibit of works from the estate of Robert De Niro, Sr., DC Moore Gallery in New York City went for the broad gesture. Robert De Niro Sr.: Paintings and Drawings 1960–1993, from now through April 28, contains 30 pieces that showcase the artist’s grand, free strokes and lines. “It became not only about how loosely he used the brush, but about how the big markings activate the canvas,” says Edward Deluca, a director of the gallery.

De Niro, Sr., father of the well-known actor, built his career on fusing abstract and representative art. Peggy Guggenheim gave him his first solo show at her Art of This Century gallery in 1946, and his works appear in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The DC Moore exhibit highlights forceful canvases such as Last Painting, a large, colorful interior that he began in 1985 and kept finessing until his death in 1993, and Autumn Landscape, painted in 1968 with slashing brushwork so bold that it seems to vibrate. Last Painting is on loan, but Autumn Landscape is available for a sum in the high five figures. “De Niro was able to take a strong Abstract Expressionist feeling and merge it with figuration,” says De Luca. “In time, people have become more open to that blend.” (212.247.2111, www.dcmooregallery.com)

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