Asia Week Kicks Off in New York

  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
    Painting of Fujiwara no Yasumasa playing the flute by moonlight by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
    Amida Waterfall on the Kisokaido by Katsushika Hokusai Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
    Amida Waterfall on the Kisokaido (detail) by Katsushika Hokusai Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
    Evening Rain at Karasaki by Utagawa Hiroshige Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
    Fragment of a Buddha Head Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
    Maitreya Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
    Maitreya (detail) Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy Joan Mirviss
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Courtesy John Eskanazi
  • Sheila Gibson Stoodley

With each successive year, Asia Week New York grows bigger and better. In 2012, no fewer than five auction houses will offer relevant sales of artworks and artifacts from China, Korea, Japan, India, and Southeast Asia, and 17 museums and other institutions will offer special programming. Indeed, the festivities cannot fit within a single week—Asia Week New York officially starts on March 16 and continues through March 24.

Galleries local and foreign will also come out in force. Joan B. Mirviss’ contribution will be the exhibition Approaching the Horizon: Important Japanese Prints from the Brewster Hanson Collection, which runs from March 14 to April 13. Hanson was an American collector who lived in Switzerland and assembled an exquisite collection of Japanese woodblock prints that included Katsushika Hokusai’s circa 1832 image Amida Waterfall on the Kisokaido Road (available for less than $20,000) and Utagawa Hiroshige’s mid-1830s Evening Rain at Karasaki (priced below $30,000). (www.mirviss.com)

London dealer John Eskenazi will take temporary residence at a friendly gallery from March 14 to 25 in Manhattan to display Southeast Asian sculptures that include a magnificent life-size stone Buddha head fragment from southern Thailand dating to between the seventh and ninth centuries and priced in the region of $200,000. He also will showcase a Nepalese gilt copper figure from the late 14th or early 15th century that is believed to depict Maitreya, the Buddha of the future, and is available for a sum in the region of $250,000. (www.john-eskenazi.com)

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