Robb Design Portfolio: Amazing Vases

<< Back to Robb Report, November 2004

Porcelain earned the nickname “white gold” from the European aristocracy who treasured it during the 18th and 19th centuries, a time when lavishly decorated objects such as this pair of 1829 palace vases denoted the wealth and power of their owners. The Russian Imperial Porcelain Factory, founded in 1744 to supply wares to the royal family and other Russian nobles, produced these two vessels early in the reign of Czar Nicholas I. The factory reached new technical and artistic heights under the tenure of the czar, particularly with larger pieces such as these, which stand 28 inches tall and measure 17 inches wide. According to Mark Schaffer of the A La Vieille Russie gallery in New York, which is offering the pair for $450,000, the vases’ ample size and their high-quality gilded and painted exteriors indicate that they were destined for one of the palaces around St. Petersburg, but it is not clear where they were installed. The gallery purchased them from a private American collection.

 

A La Vieille Russie
212.752.1727
www.alvr.com

Ferrari’s track-only hybrid supercar is now available in 1:8 scale…
Photo by Estate of Pablo Picasso Artists Rights Society, New York
Picasso’s Les Femmes d’Alger selling for $179.4 million in May is one of many recent examples…
Photo by Randall Cordero
How an Internet entrepreneur assembled a world-beating collection of arcade games…
Photo by Cordero Studios/www.corderostudios.com
A Southern California homeowner has an incredible 1,200-square-foot shrine to America’s pastime…
Photo by Iwan Baan
This September, a highly anticipated contemporary art museum—the Broad—will open in downtown Los...
How much does baseball outpace other sports memorabilia? A look at the record-setting prices for...
Paola Russo discovered two decks in Italy at G. Lorenzi, one covered in gold leaf and the other in...
When the air had cleared after the frenzy of New York’s spring art auctions, players and spectators...
Photo by Randall Cordero
Some of the rarest pieces in Greg McLemore’s collection are also the commercial flops: game...
This circa-1900 pink-swirl marble is in what Dan Morphy calls “wet mint condition,” or as pristine...