Robb Design Portfolio: Fork Art

It was crafted in 1860, at the beginning of a decades-long era when Americans employed forks, knives, spoons, and other elaborately designed tableware to flaunt their wealth and sophistication. The server and other pieces pictured here will be among the items exhibited in Feeding Desire: Design and the Tools of the Table, 1500–2005, which opens May 5 in Manhattan at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum.

The coral-handled fork shown below, which was made in Germany in the 1600s, fulfilled a cultural purpose similar to that of the macaroni server. Dinner guests of that period were expected to bring their own tableware, and fancy cutlery became a status symbol.

 

Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum,
212.849.8400,
www.cooperhewitt.org

F. Scott Fitzgerald inscribed the book with a handwritten note to Harold Goldman, the man who...
The limited-edition pen pays tribute to Alexander Fleming and to the entire medical community…
Photograph courtesy of Profiles in History
His thoughts on God, relativity, and the atomic bomb are among the letters’ contents…
And, yes, it has a laser-triggered alarm…
Courtesy of Haight Street Art Center
The Yountville winery celebrates the band’s 50th anniversary…
The Parisian silversmith partnered with the interior designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard for the...
Courtesy of Profiles in History
In honor of the Star Wars holiday on May 4, we present some of the top memorabilia from the...
Street photography is stepping into a thrilling new era...
Scott Foraker and Babe Ruth’s Bat
Collected Scott Foraker and Babe Ruth’s Bat...
Masterpieces from Pablo Picasso and Claude Monet are highlights of Christie’s upcoming auction…