Best Of The Best 2006: Big Bad Bugatti

<< Back to Robb Report, June 2006

If the Bugatti Veyron 16.4 had taken a name from its presence rather than from a French race driver, it might have been called the Bugatti Incroyable, because “incredible” is the perfect descriptor for a car that will hold its astounding position—as the Anglo-French Concorde supersonic transport did for three decades—until someone chooses to invest greater risk and daring in going further and doing better.

Unknown is how much mettle it will take to dislodge the Veyron’s implausible stats: a zero-to-60-mph time that is a gasp over two seconds and a top speed of 250 mph from the pull of 987 hp developed by a 16-cylinder engine. The Veyron’s most staggering number, however, may be its price of $1.25 million, which is roughly equal to the cost of a half-dozen Ferrari F430 Spiders.

The Veyron is a towering engineering achievement, a thing of considerable albeit bulbous beauty, and a vehicle that at slow speeds on suburban missions handles smoothly, comfortably, and safely. Magnifique.

Bugatti
www.bugatti-cars.de
 

Photo by Gerald Farber Photography
The pebble beach Concours d’Elegance and the surrounding four days of automotive auctions (...
Photo by Patrick Ernzen/RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby’s has assembled a special sale of approximately 30 postwar sports cars dubbed the...
A half-century after its historic victory in Europe, Shelby’s iconic racer returns to celebrate…
Today’s german auto museums are much more than vaults filled with old cars: They are structural...
Battery pack improvements give the car the ability to go from zero to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds…
Classic Ferraris and Porsches will be on display in all of their glory…
In addition to the Ferraris, rare cars from DuPont and Carrozzeria Touring will also be spotlighted…
The Porsche Cayman GTS is a serious sports car with a long, low profile...
Photograph by Charlie Magee
Yacht owners can stow this jet-like joyride for one in its own climate-controlled container…
Photo by Artcurial Motorcars
Auto critic Robert Ross sifts through the barn-find phenomenon at auction—and in his own garage.