The Can-Am Spyder F3 Is a Performance-Driven Three-Wheeler

  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3 Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3 Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3 Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Tyler Gourley
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Tyler Gourley
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley
    Can-Am Spyder F3-S Photo by Tyler Gourley
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Olivier Staub
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley
  • Photo by Tyler Gourley

The Can-Am Spyder’s oddball three-wheeled configuration polarized die-hard motorcyclists when it was launched in 2007. It was the brainchild of Bombardier Recreational Products (BRP)—the Canadian conglomerate responsible for the Ski-Doo snowmobile and the Sea-Doo personal watercraft—making the curious trike an appropriately disruptive force within the traditionalist motorcycling community.

For 2015, BRP has introduced the $19,500 Can-Am Spyder F3, which adds a performance-focused edge to the lineup. The Spyder F3’s silhouette underlies its sharper capabilities, which are motivated by a 115 hp inline 3-cylinder engine. The power plant can be mated to a 6-speed semiautomatic or manual gearbox. All three sets of brakes are operated by the right pedal, and various electronics systems are employed to prevent a loss of control, from an electronic stability-control system to variable-assist steering and antilock brakes.

Unlike sporty motorcycles with high seating positions and swept-back ergonomics, the Can-Am Spyder F3 features a low 26.6-inch saddle height and a comfortable, feet-forward posture. It may not be for everyone, but for speed-hungry non-purists seeking a new way to carve up their favorite canyon roads, the Can-Am Spyder F3 is sure to turn heads. (can-am.brp.com)

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