FrontRunners: Cut Above

<< Back to Robb Report, July 2007

    Chef Michael Lomonaco named his new Manhattan steak house Porter House New York (www.porterhousenewyork.com) after the cut of steak first served in the same city. Many historians believe that Martin Morrison, the proprietor of a New York porterhouse (a bar that serves ale), created the cut in 1814 when he ran out of steak and satisfied a customer by slicing a piece from a short loin. Lomonaco’s version of the cut is large enough to feed two diners, and it can be accompanied by a choice from several porters on tap at the bar.

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