3 Reasons D.C. Is Becoming a Foodie Capital

  • Roger Morris
DECEMBER 30, 2016

The center of the emerging mid-Atlantic cuisine, Washington, D.C., is now on the map as a true dining destination.

Since the turn of the century, the nation’s capital has become known not only as a United Nations of menus but also for developing its own distinctive food style—dubbed mid-Atlantic cuisine—which was acknowledged by Michelin last fall with the publication of its first guide for the city. The concept employs local ingredients, such as Chesapeake Bay seafood, Virginia beef, Pennsylvania mushrooms, and Maryland produce, and they are often prepared with an international flair.

“I moved here in 2008,” says Michael Santoro, the executive chef at Kingbird in the city’s Watergate Hotel and a devotee of cast-iron cooking, “and in the years since, the food scene has just exploded.” While acclaimed chefs such as Daniel Boulud have exported their brands to D.C. (2 years ago he opened DBGD Kitchen and Bar), the true landmarks on the culinary map seem to be homegrown. 

Featured Slideshows

From Around the Web...
The Presidents’ favorite foods tell us something about them—and ourselves…
A British brand elevates the humble tea leaf to the vaunted level of the coffee bean…
Get hands-on lessons from celebrity-chef James Martin at Chewton Glen’s new culinary experience…
These chef-made hot sauces will add a tingle to your lips and a rush of heat to your heart…
Whether you’re single, taken, or it’s complicated, these chocolates will make your Valentine’s Day...
From a spice rub class to a chocolate fondue session, these classes are worth falling for…
Woo your sweetheart at one of these fine-dining hideaways and hot spots…
Embrace the cheese this February 14 with pecorino, triple crème, and Gouda…
Photo credit HilHaven Lodge
Chef Adam Perry Lang on his relationship to meat and the draw of fire-roasted cooking…
Co-hosted by 17 wineries, the region’s three-day open house will certainly sate the senses…