Diet-Tribe

  • Mitch Feinberg
    The average American consumes 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day, according to the American Heart Association. Mitch Feinberg
  • The panel
  • Mitch Feinberg
    The American Cancer Society recommends consuming at least 2½ cups of a variety of vegetables and fruits each day. Mitch Feinberg
  • Mitch Feinberg
    Eating one to two three-ounce servings of fatty fish a week reducesthe risk of dying from heart disease by 36 percent. Mitch Feinberg
  • Mitch Feinberg
  • Mitch Feinberg
  • Mitch Feinberg
<< Back to Health & Wellness, January 2015
  • Terri Trespicio

Four Doctors Face Off on our Most Pressing Nutrition Issues

The nutrition headlines from the past year have all the plot twists and turns of a Christopher Nolan film: The good guys are now the bad guys, the old standbys are not to be trusted, and the accursed have been vindicated.

Two significant studies this past year threw into serious doubt everything we thought we knew about what is "good" or "bad" for us. A University of Cambridge study raised questions about the link between saturated fats and heart disease—as well as the nutritional guidelines that have long advised us to restrict their consumption. In this meta-analysis of 72 unique studies, researchers found that total saturated fatty acid as a biomarker was not associated with coronary heart disease risk. In another study, sugar (more specifically fructose, a derivative of sugar featured prominently in many processed foods) took another hit when researchers at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found more evidence of its links to disease promotion and metabolism destruction.

Thirty years ago, the science indicated we should bar saturated fats from our diets—leaving the back door open to sugar, which snuck in with nearly every new low-fat product to hit the grocery. Now many physicians see the fat-free craze as a blunder that escalated the nation’s obesity epidemic and its ensuing spectrum of related diseases (heart disease, diabetes, cancer). Such sudden shifts, however, make most consumers uneasy. Can we trust the new science? Should we? Here to help set the record straight are four authorities on diet and nutrition: Richard Carmona, MD, the 17th U.S. Surgeon General; Joel Fuhrman, MD, author of The End of Dieting; Robert Lustig, MD, professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco and author of Fat Chance; and Pamela Peeke, MD, an expert on food addictions and most recently the author of The Hunger Fix.

(Continues on next page...)

From Around the Web...
Chiva-Som (which means haven of life in Thai) has been known as Asia’s first comprehensive...
The beachside resort of Amanoi in the Ninh Thuan Province, Vietnam, is a serene getaway...
Vegan chef Matthew Kenney’s journey has more twists and turns than a Hollywood blockbuster. The...
Photo by Jamie Macfayden
Upgrade your travel experiences by following these 10 tips for getting premium sleep while away...
Following the frenzy that is the holiday season, many people will be looking to relax and unwind—...
This next generation of wearable trackers goes beyond the mere measurement of steps taken (though...
Photo by J.Gatherum/Shutterstock
Improve memory, focus, and cognition with these simple strategies from one of the country’s...
Montage Palmetto Bluff, located in South Carolina’s Lowcountry along the May River, debuted a 13,...
Another reason to add more physical activity to a daily routine: Sedentary behavior has been found...
A new skincare line, Kayo, introduces body creams that you will want to use on your face. Until now...