New Research Could Lead to Better Treatment for Hearing Loss

    Scientists zoom in and out as the brain processes sound

    Researchers at Johns Hopkins have mapped the sound-processing part of the mouse brain in a way that keeps both the proverbial forest and the trees in view. Their imaging technique allows zooming in and out on views of brain activity within mice, and it enabled the team to watch brain cells light up as mice “called” to each other. The results, which represent a step toward better understanding how our own brains process language, appeared online July 31 the journal  .

    In the past, researchers often studied sound processing in various animal brains by poking tiny electrodes into the auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes sound. They then played tones and observed the response of nearby neurons, laboriously repeating the process over a grid-like pattern to figure out where the active neurons were. The neurons seemed to be laid out in neatly organized bands, each responding to a different tone. More recently, a technique called two-photon microscopy has allowed researchers to focus in on minute slices of the live mouse brain, observing activity in unprecedented detail. This newer approach has suggested that the well-manicured arrangement of bands might be an illusion. But, says David Yue, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of biomedical engineering and neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, “You could lose your way within the zoomed-in views afforded by two-photon microscopy and not know exactly where you are in the brain.” Yue led the study along with Eric Young, Ph.D., also a professor of biomedical engineering and a researcher in Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences.

    (Continues on next page...)

    From Around the Web...
    DAY TWO Four speakers shared during Friday's morning sessions. 9 am Managing Stress like an Olympic...
    Originally published in the Fall 2015 issue of Robb Report Health & Wellness as “High Tech =...
    illustration by Thomas Fuchs
    Originally published in the Fall 2015 issue of Robb Report Health & Wellness as “Medical Myth...
    Originally published in the Fall 2015 issue of Robb Report Health & Wellness as “Road to...
    Photo by SD619/iStock
    Originally published in the Fall 2015 issue of Robb Report Health & Wellness as “Intelligent...
    Originally published in the Summer 2015 issue of Robb Report Health & Wellness as “Q&A with...
    Illustration by Mark Summers
    Belly Bugs + Brainpower  The acclaimed neurologist champions the power of the gut microbiome as the...
    Illustrations by Gracia Lam
    Cancer cells are clever. Researchers characterize them as wily, smart, sneaky, and stubborn. But...
    illustration by Mark Summers
    CNN’s chief medical correspondent is working on his third film about medical marijuana, a treatment...
    A spa debut and new health programming yield powerful results at three Southwestern resorts. The...