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Nuts May Boost Longevity

    When a doctor changes her daily eating plan based on the results of her own medical research, it seems like a prescription for us all to follow suit. Nuts have remained a crucial source of protein, healthy fats, and antioxidants (peanuts are surprisingly rich in resveratrol) from ancient times to the present day, where they play a prominent role in vegetarian and raw-food diets. In a recent examination of a 30-year study, scientists have confirmed what many physicians already knew: People who ate nuts more often were less likely to develop heart disease, cancer, and respiratory disease. But the study, which tracked more than 118,000 men and women, also revealed for the first time that nut-consumers live longer. According to lead author Ying Bao, MD, “Our study found that people who ate nuts seven or more times per week, as compared with those who did not eat nuts, had a 20 percent reduction in death rate.” She added that she now consumes nuts more frequently herself.

     

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