Best Of The Best 2006: Liberating Kitchen Layouts

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The company that introduced the first built-in wall oven in 1955, the double-oven in 1956, and the black glass oven in 1965 now presents the Thermador Freedom Collection, a line of modular refrigeration components that are the kitchen design equivalent of Legos.

“Refrigerators are the most limiting factors in kitchen design because they are big and bulky,” says Michael Bohn, Thermador’s director of brand marketing. “By separating the freezer and refrigerator into separate columns, we’re giving our customers the freedom to put refrigeration wherever it fits best.”

The collection includes separate 18- to 30-inch refrigeration and freezer units along with the more traditional 36- and 72-inch units that combine a refrigerator and a bottom-drawer freezer. So that you can integrate any of the units with the rest of your kitchen design, each has a hinging system that will support a custom panel weighing as much as 220 pounds.

“We try to deliver things that are useful—even if no one is asking for it,” says Bohn. “Ultimately, however, we do know what people want, which is more flexibility in how they can design their kitchens.”

Thermador
800.656.9226
www.thermador.com

Photo by Tony Soluri
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