Home: Food Network

  • Computerized custom cabinets from Anvil Motion ($300,000 as shown) integrate with a home’s media, lighting, HVAC, and security systems.
  • William Kissel

Anvil Motion is not the world’s only computerized cabinetry system for the kitchen, but it may be the smartest. Introduced in July by custom cabinetmaker Anvil Cabinet & Mill, of Brigham City, Utah, Anvil Motion is the first automated cabinetry to be both button- and motion-activated. It is also the first such system to integrate with other automated home operations, such as media, lighting, HVAC, and security.

"The kitchen can be programmed to respond to your preset preferences," says Randy Deem, president of the family-owned company. Tapping a wireless touchscreen or waving a hand near a motion sensor prompts cabinet doors to open and close. "We created tapered doors that rise at an angle vertically, instead of folding upward," says Deem. "The doors rest in a docking station inside the top of the cabinet, so you don’t need to dodge the panels as you do with some other automation options." Groups of doors can be set to open and close synchronously.

Those who favor synchronicity will likely appreciate Anvil Motion’s integration with other automated home operations. The system syncs with automated lighting to provide specific levels of illumination for baking, food preparation, and other activities. In addition, Deem says, "the heating-and-cooling system of the home will recognize that you are going to be cooking, and begin to offset the heat created by the appliances with an infusion of cool air. And the media system can unveil a TV that is preset to the channel of your choice." For security and safety, Anvil’s fingerprint-recognition technology can restrict access to drawers containing sharp implements or to cupboards holding medicines.

Users can enter into the system their preferences for any number of kitchen-use scenarios, which are cued via touchscreen. A grilling scenario might open cabinets housing barbecue spices, utensils, and dishware, while a food-preparation scenario could open cabinets containing bowls and baking dishes, adjust lighting to optimize visibility, and retract doors to reveal ovens and other appliances.

Anvil Motion kitchens start around $150,000, depending on the client’s specifications. The company does not have a menu of wood choices, architectural designs, or hardware options; instead, the client provides input on everything—from the style of carving and the type of finish to the selection of appliances and the user-friendliness of the touchscreen. Anvil’s research-and-design department will work directly with a client’s designer to achieve a kitchen that best suits their taste. "We haven’t been restrictive," says Deem, "because we want the end users to feel free to create literally any design they want."

Anvil Motion, 435.723.5001, www.anvilmotion.com

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