Modern Family

  • Nestled in the Tuscan landscape, the mostly subterranean structure of the Marchesi Antinori Chianti Classico Cellar is situated on 10 acres of olive groves and vineyards.
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Marco Casamonti of the Archea Associati studio designed the structure with many native materials, including terra-cotta from the Tuscan region of Impruneta. Most of the building is underground, but the restaurant is visible from street level and shaded by an overhang. Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • The winery’s dramatic design celebrates the family’s past and marks its way into the future. “The project represents history, but, more importantly, it’s a new vision for the forthcoming 26 generations of Antinori,” says Marchese Piero Antinori, the winery’s president.
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    The view from the entrance to the cellar, looking upward. Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    The entrance to the cellar’s winemaking facilities. The circular shapes in the terra-cotta walls are inspired by the Chianti region’s rolling hills. Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    A staircase made by local Italian craftspeople recalls the shape of a corkscrew and leads from the Cellar’s entrance to its rooftop, where visitors can take in the panoramic vineyard view. Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • A geometric-patterned skylight sheds light on the staircase that leads from the reception area to the staff offices.
  • The reception area features an open plan that can accommodate numerous guests at once.
  • Iconostase, a 2012 sculpture by Yona Friedman, occupies the open-air courtyard.
  • An interior resting area features furnishings by Moroso, with pieces designed by Patricia Urquiola, Toshiyuki Kita, Ross Lovegrove, and Ron Arad.
  • With seating for 150 people, the auditorium shows works by the French video artist Jean-Baptiste Decavèle and films about the Antinori family and the Cellar’s architecture.
  • Visitors can purchase Antinori merchandise, as well as the family’s wine, in the gift shop.
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    This aging room’s curved walls resemble those of a barrel. Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • A glass-enclosed tasting room overlooks the aging room, where the wine is stored in barrels made exclusively for the Antinoris.
  • Among the items on display at the cellar’s museum are historic pieces collected by the Antinori family; paintings of the founder, Marchesi Antinori; the Antinori coat of arms, created by Giovanni della Robbia in 1512; ceramics; and family documents. All of these are newly available for viewing by the public.
  • Also on view at the museum is an ancient wine press fashioned by Leonardo da Vinci. The piece has been in the Antinori family’s collection for generations.
  • This iron staircase leads from the top of the cellar to the production area.
  • The fermentation room contains steel vats with a total capacity of 30,000 hectoliters.
  • A close-up of the terra-cotta wall reveals its precision and artistry.
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
    Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Photo by Pietro Savorelli
  • Samantha Brooks

Now open to the public, the Marchesi Antinori Chianti Classico Cellar, located about 30 minutes from Florence, is a modern-day tribute to the family-owned winery’s 625 years and 26 generations of winemaking. The new 67,000-square-foot facility, the development of which began in 2005, includes a restaurant, an auditorium, a wine shop, a library, and a visitors’ center (tours start at $27), all designed by the architect Marco Casamonti of Archea Associati. From the exterior, the structure blends unobtrusively into the Tuscan landscape of vineyards, olive groves, and oak trees but offers a strikingly modern design scheme in its largely subterranean interior.

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