One for the Ages

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Milling About

In the converted barn, original oak trusses offer striking aerial accents against stark white walls. A round stone coffee table in a pool-facing lounge with 23-foot-high ceilings is actually a millstone that was found on the site and topped with black-stained oak. Swimsuit-ready stained-oak benches feature gray open-weave polyester cushions that resist mold and moisture. The space’s eccentrically sized windows are remnants of the days when the British empire was constantly under siege: “They built small windows for protection from invaders and because glass was very expensive,” Barratt-Campbell explains.

Above the kitchen on the barn’s second level, a clear glass Arctic Pear chandelier from Ochre illuminates a stained-oak bar. The low-back oak bar stools upholstered in white leather are from Wychwood Design. A cluster of four 19th-century Chinese nesting tables with black stone tops adds an elegant touch to a lounge area that also includes a custom sofa upholstered in gray faux suede.

Supportive Measures

The barn originally was built with various nooks that served different agricultural purposes. Barratt-Campbell had no choice but to incorporate the openings into her design. “All windows and doors are listed,” she says, “so we plastered and painted them clean, crisp white.”

In the enclosed polished-concrete walkway, ­Barratt-Campbell embraced the building’s aged foundation. “This really seamless, very new modern material runs right into these raw, 400-year-old walls,” the designer notes. To strengthen the barn’s structure, steel cable ties are strung among the oak trusses above the polished-cast-concrete pool, which is wrapped in teak decking that houses three stainless-steel waterspouts.

Oak trusses also cross the roof of a bathroom in the new addition. The space, which is located in the former brew-house portion of the structure, features radiant floor heating concealed under limestone tile. The historic setting presented a unique set of challenges for Barratt-Campbell, such as fitting Roman blinds into windows that have stone mullions nearly 2 feet thick.

Living Large

It took 17 men and the removal of a window to install a pair of nearly 10-foot-tall black mirrors—from a 19th-century Venetian palazzo—in the main house’s formal living area. The stone fireplace comes from France, and the sculpture on the railroad-tie coffee table is by Joseph Cals. Nearly everything else is custom, from the silk-and-suede rug and glazed-linen-and-lace curtains to the polyester/cotton-upholstered sofas and velvet-upholstered chairs with linen and silk cushions.

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