The Best of the Best 2003: Jewelry - Tiffany's

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It took nearly five years to accumulate the harmoniously matched South
Sea pearls for Tiffany’s prized necklace, which has a price tag of $447,500. The jeweler has just one strand of this stature and can only hope to complete another next year; there are no guarantees.

Most of Tiffany’s South Sea pearls come from Nick Paspaley’s farm in Darwin, Australia, considered the world’s premier source for exceptional quality pearls. A harvest of some 6,000 pearls might be required to find the perfect 31 in the 18-millimeter size needed to assemble a well-constructed strand.

The key characteristics that distinguish Tiffany’s South Sea strands are exceptional luster, uniform color, and seamless graduation in size. Clearly, it requires patience and perseverance to create a necklace of such extraordinary rarity and beauty.

Tiffany & Co., 800.526.0649, www.tiffany.com

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