2015 best of the best
Sports Cars

LAMBORGHINI Huracán LP 610-4
A fast-moving storm with a calm inside.

—Ronald Ahrens

As the replacement for the Gal­lardo, Lamborghini’s all-time best-selling model, the Huracán LP 610-4 had to be good. It is better than good: It is excellent, featuring advanced design, extraordinary performance, exquisite build quality, and good manners.

The Gallardo’s great shortcoming was a 6-speed automated-manual transmission that, thanks to the clunking brutality of its shifting, made the car seem like a piece of mechanized armor. The Huracán’s new 7-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox eliminates all that commotion, executing gear changes quickly and smoothly. And the all-wheel-drive system puts power down with electronically regulated, electrohydraulically controlled authority.

The Huracán may appear too extreme for daily commutes, but it is more refined than it looks. The spacious interior, good visibility (for a mid-engine car), light-touch controls, and docility in city traffic support the argument that this $238,500 vehicle is more than just a 2,000-mile-per-year toy.

Three driving modes—Strada, Sport, and Corsa—govern the car’s performance. Selecting Strada for around-town duties relaxes the power train and suppresses exhaust sounds, summoning up a tranquility that suggests this supercar has been adding Lexus powder to its green smoothies. On the track, the Corsa mode reinforces the message imparted by the car’s scowling, sinister-looking face. The driving mode tightens the chassis and suspension, allowing the 610 hp, 5.2-liter V-10 to produce operatic flourishes. When the launch control is engaged, the Huracán can rip from zero to 60 mph in less than 3.2 seconds before topping out at 202 mph.

The Huracán’s shape, derived from that of the Countach, features a simple, clean line that starts at the hood and continues over the roof. But the design is also complex, with an interplay of overlapping surfaces and transitions between concave and convex surfaces.

Inside the Huracán, simplicity and symmetry prevail. The fat, flat-bottom steering wheel is paired with huge paddle shifters, and an elegant central console contains the secondary controls. A 12.3-inch full-color thin-film transistor instrument panel displays the rev counter and speed indicator, navigation maps, and infotainment functions.