Fitting Frenzy

  • James A. Frank

As golf equipment has improved, so has the art of club fitting, which now offers countless configurations and options to help get the most from your swing. 

Somewhere around the 100th ball, it clicked. I could not miss. Every shot flew exactly where I was aiming—high if I wanted high, right to left if that was the intention. Then Allen Gobeski started playing games.

“Hit this one,” he would say, handing me a different club. Without looking to see what make and model it was, I would swing. The ball might not go as high as I wanted it to or turn the way it should turn. “Okay,” he would say, “now this one.”

It went on like that for a few hours on a warm winter afternoon at Grayhawk Golf Club in Scottsdale, Ariz., where Gobeski—a master fitter for the Scottsdale company Cool Clubs—and I were the only ones on the driving range. Just a golfer, a club fitter, and a trailer full of clubheads and shafts, connectable in thousands of combinations. After about three hours, it felt like I had hit every possible permutation.

My session at the range was the second half of a full-day program with Cool Clubs, a golf-club-fitting company located just a few minutes from Grayhawk. I had started at the Cool Clubs office, which also serves as a showroom, testing-and-fitting lab, and assembly plant. At the facility, Gobeski, a former teaching pro, calibrated and recorded every component of my swing and putting stroke. My existing clubs were measured, my putting motion captured in high-speed digital images, and data points from my hundreds of swings fed into a computer. Gobeski also took notes and made comments on my far-from-perfect swing and its wide range of results. At the conclusion of the two-part session, Gobeski would tell me if my current clubs were helping or hurting my game—and, of course, advise me on which clubs and shafts I should consider replacing them with.

Golf equipment has never been better. Materials, aerodynamics, computer-aided design, high-tech manufacturing, and other advances have seen to that. The technology packed into heads and shafts means it is possible to create clubs that help golfers good and bad get the most out of their swings—but only if those components are accurately matched to the golfer doing the swinging.

“Golfers come in all shapes, sizes, and swing skills, which means they need different club lengths, weights, lofts, and lie angles,” explains Tom Wishon, an independent club designer and fitter for nearly 40 years. “There is no such thing as one-size-fits-all golf clubs.”

Club fitting is certainly not new. Bobby Jones, the amateur nonpareil and winner of the 1930 Grand Slam, complained that…

Pick up a copy of Robb Report's July issue, on newsstands July 1, or download the digital edition to read the rest of this article as well as all the content from this issue.

Read Next Article >>
Driven by winner-take-all energy, these equines and their riders put on a mesmerizing performance...
"I think we’re going to ski that,” I say jokingly to my neighbor in the Eurocopter AS350 AStar. To...
Photo by Paul Morrison
“This run is called Sex Wax,” Rob Orvig says with a casualness that seems at odds with the crevasse...
Photo by David Cannon
The package includes two nights at the K Club’s palatial Straffan House…
I am standing in the shadows of the 11,000-foot-high Tête du Ruitor, staring down a spectacular...
The sleek new table can be customized with a wide range of cloth and finish colors…
Summer fun on two or four wheels, on the waves, or above the water…
Photo by Chris Tedesco/Red Bull Content Pool
At the Mint 400, a novice takes the wheel of an off-road race machine—and goes for the win. The...
Photo by Cody Maxwell
Dick Estey dominated amateur golf tournaments until he had to quit playing. But that did not stop...
Photo by Brian G. Oar - Fairways Photography
As golf equipment has improved, so has the art of club fitting...