Arts Race

  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
    From left: Jaquet Droz Petite Heure Minute Paillonnée, $43,900; Vacheron Constantin Métiers d’Art Fabuleux Ornements Chinese Embroidery, $154,800. Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
    From left: Hermès Arceau Millefiori, price upon request; Chanel Mademoiselle Privé Ref. H3823, $45,500; Dior VIII Grand Bal Fil de Soie, $46,500; Patek Philippe Ref. 5077/100G-013 mixed-technique enamel watch, $91,400. Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
    From left: Piaget Altiplano Scrimshaw, $55,500; Harry Winston Avenue C Precious Marquetry, $41,500. Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
    From left: Corum Heritage Artisans Feather Watch, $37,000; Van Cleef & Arpels Midnight Chance Tortue, price upon request; Cartier D’Art Rotonde de Cartier Mystery Watch, $148,000. Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
  • Photography by Jeff Harris; Styling by Peter Tran
<< Back to Robb Report, November 2014

Once-obscure decorative techniques have now become as vital to the prestige of rival watchmaking houses as their complicated movements.

Over the last five years, an explosion of creative techniques used to decorate watch dials and cases has all but dwarfed innovation in timepiece mechanics. “It’s a good time right now,” says Philippe Delhotal, creative and development director of Hermès’s watch division, La Montre Hermès. “Without the [increase in decorative watches,] many artisans might have closed their doors. On the other hand, I’m worried that every company now wants to do métiers d’art watches.” 

Delhotal’s observation succinctly summarizes the current state of the watch industry. Techniques such as engraving and enameling have long been a part of watchmaking’s repertoire, but many companies are currently employing individuals and processes that have previously been strangers to horological pursuits. As these brands seek to best one another, decorative arts are gaining a level of prestige in Switzerland that was once solely the province of elaborate complications.

Hermès, for its part, has drawn on its decorative-art capabilities to create special collections of watches since 2008. Initially these pieces focused on traditional crafts, including enameling; but after introducing a dial composed of straw marquetry in 2012, the company pushed its creative limits. The Arceau Millefiori, one of the brand’s latest models, perfectly exemplifies this effort: After immersing himself in the company’s vast portfolio of work, Delhotal ultimately decided to use a technique from the Hermès-owned Cristallerie de Saint-Louis to create a watch with a multicolored, handblown crystal dial.

Other brands have also embraced the trend. Despite its long-standing expertise in jeweling watches and making lapidary dials, Piaget has typically offered only a very limited number of traditionally engraved and enameled pieces, most of them based on themes from various Asian cultures. This year, however, the company introduced women’s watches with hand-embroidered floral dials, as well as men’s watches that feature another art form that is new to watchmaking: mammoth-ivory scrimshaw. At Chanel, a recent collaboration with the enamelist Anita Porchet—originally intended to result in only a handful of pieces—has yielded the Mademoiselle Privé collection, which now consists of eight models and is growing. Among other techniques, these watches showcase mother-of-pearl carving and Japanese maki-e lacquer, the latter of which allows Chanel to render its camellia motif in a combination of gold and quail eggshell.

Even brands with legacies in decorative crafts traditionally incorporated into watchmaking, such as enameling, have explored new possibilities. Patek Philippe’s annual collection of enameled dome clocks and wristwatches, which used to be displayed only once before disappearing into the hands of collectors, now features inventive mixed techniques, and the latest compendium is scheduled for multiple exhibitions.

Historically, independent artisans have been responsible for the traditional handcrafts at the largest brands—a practice that continues even as new techniques emerge. In 2007, Van Cleef & Arpels, flush from the success of its Poetic Complications wristwatches, released a series of tourbillons with complex, mixed-technique dials. The Midnight Tourbillons featured scenes decorated with mother-of-pearl, engraving, jeweling, and enamel, and served as the forerunners of the Extraordinary Dials series that has since attained critical and commercial success. 

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