FrontRunners: Content Be Gone

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Pushing small buttons is difficult when you are wearing gloves—a fact that has prevented Swiss engineers from dressing up dive watches with extraneous complications. Finally, however, someone has devised a practical function that can actually be used underwater. The IWC (www.iwc.ch, 800.432. 9330) Aquatimer Split Minute Chronograph ($8,700 with a rubber strap and $9,700 with a metal bracelet) is a chronograph with a separate fly-back hand for recording intermediate times. While the fly-back hand is a common feature on land, in water it can be even more useful, aiding in controlled ascents, when decompression stops are necessary. The separate minute hand is controlled by a large slide toggle on the side of the case and functions to a depth of 120 meters—the watch’s operating limit. Best of all, the toggle clicks easily and firmly into operating mode for when your wet suit makes you feel as dexterous as the Michelin Man.

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