Harry Winston Enlists a Dynamic Duo to Run Its Newest Movement

The Harry Winston Ocean Tourbillon Jumping Hour—one of the latest timepieces in the watchmaker’s Ocean Collection—employs a new mechanical movement that features both a tourbillon and a jumping hour. The movement utilizes 330 components that took more than 1,500 hours to develop.

The tourbillon has a 60-second rotating cycle and runs while suspended from two steel bridges—rather than at the back of the movement, as in most models. It is positioned between two panes of sapphire glass, so it appears to be floating. At every hour, the numeral jumps, visible through an aperture at 12 o’clock. The tourbillon is driven by a wheel, concealed by the minute track, that circles the outer edge of the dial. The Ocean Tourbillon Jumping Hour has a frequency of 4Hz and a power reserve of 110 hours, which are indicated on the case back. The watch is available in a case of 18-karat white or rose gold, either with 58 baguette-cut diamonds (10 editions of each, at $378,400) or without (75 of each at $217,300); all are on an alligator strap. (www.harrywinston.com)

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