The HYT H3 Pushes the Boundaries of Watchmaking

  • Photo by Jeremy Frelechox
    Photo by Jeremy Frelechox
  • Photo by Jeremy Frelechox

The pioneer of fluid-based haute horlogerie, HYT, introduced at this year’s Baselworld watch and jewelry show its latest model to feature liquid in the timekeeping mechanism. Departing from previous models, which marked the advancement of time with colored liquid that traveled clockwise around the periphery of the bezel, the HYT H3 is the company’s first watch to indicate time with a linear display.

Two opposing bellows drive the green fluid, displaying the time in six-hour increments. When the liquid reaches the rightmost limit of its tube, the bellows reverse their movement, returning the fluid to its original position, and using the energy recovered through this process to advance a four-sided, rotating dial that displays the next six hours. The minutes are indicated by a retrograde hand that occupies the lower right portion of the watch’s face. The H3 will be limited to 25 pieces and is priced at $290,000. (hytwatches.com)

 

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