Jaeger-LeCoultre Reboots the Reverso Collection for Its 85th Anniversary

  • Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso
  • Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso
  • Victoria Gomelsky

Since its introduction in 1931, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso has stood as an icon of modern watchmaking. Over time, however, the range of watches in the line grew a tad unruly.

“Two years ago, we saw that the collection was composed of 53 different cases and five styles of dial,” says Daniel Riedo, Jaeger-LeCoultre’s chief executive. “It was time to refocus on the codes of the Reverso.”

The Geneva-based brand decided to use the occasion of the model’s 85th anniversary this year to introduce a new, streamlined Reverso collection that places a greater emphasis on simplification, feminine designs, and personalization, while highlighting the codes that make the Reverso a masterpiece of art deco design—chiefly, its unique geometric swiveling case, invented, as the story goes, to please an officer of the British Raj who requested a timepiece that could withstand the rigors of polo.

Jaeger-LeCoultre has, by its own description, “clarified” the collection into three distinct “stylistic expressions”: Reverso Classic, Reverso Tribute, and Reverso One.

The Classic collection maintains the original Reverso’s ideal proportions that correspond to the golden ratio developed by ancient mathematicians. Available in small, medium, and large sizes (priced in steel at $4,150; $8,500; and $8,850, respectively), the Classic model is distinguished by a black-and-white front dial and a plain steel back that lends itself well to engraving. Two additional models in the collection, the Reverso Classic Large Duo and the Reverso Classic Duetto, each feature secondary dials.

The Tribute series houses the line’s three more-complicated offerings: the Reverso Tribute Duo ($12,200 in steel), whose two dials offer multiple looks in one; the Reverso Tribute Calendar ($25,200 in pink gold), a duo-face model whose complete calendar function includes a hammered moon-phase display; and the Reverso Tribute Gyrotourbillon (around $297,000), a gorgeous openwork biaxial tourbillon.

Reverso One is dedicated to the ladies. Featuring a slightly elongated case that mimics the style of 1930s case shapes, the line comprises three different styles: the Réédition ($4,900 in steel), a vintage-inspired miniaturized model with a sleek black dial; the Cordonnet ($7,600 in pink gold or steel), which comes on a thin leather cord strap borrowed from a 1936 timepiece; and the Duetto Moon, a more contemporary, double-faced moon-phase model.

The firm also has created a personalization service dubbed Atelier Reverso that allows customers to choose aesthetic features to distinguish their timepieces from the pack. “I believe that luxury is more and more about personalization and exclusivity,” Riedo says, “and what is more easy to personalize than the back of the Reverso?” (jaeger-lecoultre.com)

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