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What follows is our curated list, in no particular order, of the current essential tastemakers, objects and locations.

This Underwater Restaurant’s Prime Table Has the Best Views Across All the Seven Seas

Not for lighthearted landlubbers, of course.

A glimpse inside Under, a subaquatic restaurant. TOR ERIK SCHRODER/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Europe’s first submerged restaurant has made quite a splash. Booked for more than six months out, scoring a seat at the Snøhetta-designed Under is no easy feat. But if you’re going to journey all the way to Lindesnes, Norway, to walk the gangplank and enjoy all the local produce (and, of course, wildlife) the North Atlantic has to offer, make sure you grab the best seat in the house.

In the view of Under senior architect Rune Grasdal, it’s table 30, “on the far right-hand side of the restaurant, closest to the window.” The spot provides a front-row seat to Under’s 11-foot-tall view and a welcome respite from foot traffic, as the VIP vantage point sits in the far corner of the restaurant—the farthest away from the staircase leading down to Under’s dining area. 

Granted, it’s hard not to benefit from a viewing window of such magnitude, but the great minds over at Snøhetta (a.k.a. Grasdal & Co.) didn’t exactly stuff the place to the gills, eitherthe restaurant’s 40-person capacity effectively keeps views unobstructed. And if one oversized acrylic lens isn’t enough for you, the bar on the mezzanine level sits adjacent to a vertical window, one that runs from above to below sea level, so guests can enjoy both while sipping an after-dinner digestif.

Under Restaurant

An exterior view of the Snøhetta-designed Under.  Inger Marie Grini

That being said, a six-month-plus wait is an undeniably long onehowever, it’s an exclusivity Under maintains so its vistas remain unspoiled and uncrowded. Naturally, as the brains behind the operation, Grasdal agrees, “This is the most special project I’ve ever worked on,” he adds. “Of course, it can be a bit scary to be underwater. But when you enter, it’s very comforting, very open. It was important for us to create a good feeling.”

So if you’re going to brave Lindesnes’ oft-extreme weather conditions, it might be worth plonking down at Grasdal’s table 30. Here, you can enjoy your rugose squat lobster in peace—despite its compatriots making the rounds outside.

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