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LG’s New OLED TVs Will Use Chemistry and Machine Learning for Brighter, Crisper Picture Quality

The next-generation tech offers a 30 percent increase in brightness, enhanced accuracy and more.

LG OLED EX Technology LG Display

Things are looking brighter for LG’s high-definition TVs.

The company’s LG Display division will unveil its newest innovation, dubbed OLED EX, at CES 2022. By swapping the hydrogen used in traditional OLED displays for deuterium, a stable isotope of hydrogen extracted from water, the new technology can increase your TV’s brightness by up to 30 percent, resulting in richer color and more accurate details. It’ll also allow LG to reduce some units’ thickness by up to 30 percent compared to existing OLED displays. In a statement, the company shared that it plans to start incorporating the new tech into all its OLED panels starting in 2022.

LG OLED EX Technology

An LG OLED EX tv display.  LG Display

But LG isn’t just relying on the screen itself: A ‘personal algorithm’, based on machine technology, will help the OLED EX TVs to adapt to the content on the screen in real-time, and “precisely control the display’s energy input to more accurately express the details and colors of the video content being played.” The algorithm is said to be able to predict the usage of up to 33 million organic light-emitting diodes based on 8K OLED displays. It does this by learning your individual viewing patterns, and from there, it controls the display’s energy input to accurately display the details and colors of the videos you select to watch.

“Despite the global TV market experiencing a 12 percent decline this year, we still observed a 70 percent growth in OLED sales,” says Dr. Oh Chang-ho, who leads the TV business unit at LG Display in a statement. “With our new OLED EX technology, we aim to provide even more innovative, high-end customer experiences through the evolution of our OLED technology, algorithms and designs.” Visit LGDisplay.com for more information.

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