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This New WiFi-Enabled Grill Is So Smart It Can Monitor Your Cooking and Send You Recipes

The company's WiFire tech connects the grill to an app on your smartphone.

Traeger Ironwood 885 Grill Traeger

Coronavirus or no, summer is fast approaching, and with it comes barbecue season. If you want to kick off your post-Quarantine season (fingers crossed) with a brand-new BBQ, the grill geniuses over at Traeger have created a model that promises to make your cookout easier than ever.

Yes, we know, shiny new cooking devices that claim to make your culinary life easier are a dime a dozen. But thanks to its impressive WiFi capabilities, the Ironwood 885 is the rare grill that may actually deliver on that promise.

Traeger’s brand-specific WiFire tech connects the grill to an app on your smartphone that gives you more control over your cooking. From the app you’ll be able to select a recipe with the tap of a finger, monitor your meal’s progress and even get alerts should you need to turn your attention to another facet of the cooking. No, the Ironwood 885 isn’t the only WiFi-enabled grill on the market, but thanks to Traeger’s app, it appears to be one of the most convenient, taking some of the most annoying and time-consuming aspects of cooking off your, well, plate.

Beyond its WiFire tech, the Ironwood 885 also boasts other cutting-edge features. The D2 Direct Drive system that monitors temperature to make sure that it remains consistent. When the heat dips, the controller even moves wooden pellets from the 20-lb. capacity hopper to the fire box to give things a boost. For 2020, a now-standard pellet sensor will also alert the app when the hopper needs to be refilled.

Traeger Ironwood 885 Grill

Traeger Ironwood 885 Grill  Traeger

Of course, all that tech would be for naught if the grill couldn’t actually cook meat. The Ironwood 885 features has a max cooking temperature of 500ºF and 885 square inches of grill space to work with. That means you’ll be able to cook 10 chickens, seven rib racks or nine pork butts at once, which should be more than enough. With that much space, it’s easy to see why the grill tips the scales at a not-exactly-featherweight 170 lbs.

If the Ironwood 885 looks familiar to you (or vaguely like a sidecar for a vintage motorcycle), there’s a good reason for that. The grill was included as part of the company’s one-off motorcycle-grill collaboration with Indian Motorcycles last year. Fortunately, the grill itself is a lot less rare than the bike, though you can expect to drop $1,500 to make it yours. Meanwhile, the slightly more petite Ironwood 650 costs $1,200.

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