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From Virgin Galactic to Space X: 3 Space Suits for Future Star Travelers

A first look at the out-of-this-world fashion.

Virgin Galactic space suit Virgin Galactic

While the modern tourist–astronaut will soon have his pick of rides into the great beyond, it’s not all about rocket size: Each company will kit out passengers in a proprietary—and contemporarily styled—space suit. Here’s what you could be wearing for the ultimate, once-in-a-lifetime selfie. Plan accordingly.

Virgin Galactic

Virgin Galactic space suit Richard Branson

Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson in the company’s space suit.  Virgin Galactic

Developed with Under Armour, this breathable, flexible suit will be custom-fitted to each passenger during their three-day pre-flight training. It comes in a handsome deep blue with gold accents and plenty of pockets. Lightweight materials like Nomex keep weight to a barely-there 5.5 pounds. The designers also used Nomex in the seating so there’s an unusual comfort factor for the tourist astronaut. Since SpaceShipTwo will reach only suborbital altitudes, there’s no pressurization or helmet required. Discreet integrated pads will protect passengers during zero-gravity floats.

SpaceX

SpaceX space suit

NASA astronauts wearing special SpaceX suits before a recent launch.  SpaceX

Created by Hollywood costumer Jose Fernandez (Wonder Woman, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice) this suit has the vibe of a Star Wars stormtrooper in a tux, but it’s also light (only about 20 pounds) flexible and fire-resistant. A single plug connects it to the spacecraft’s power, communications and air systems, making it exceptionally streamlined while also protecting against cabin depressurization.

Boeing Starliner

Boeing Starliner space suit

The deep azure space suit riffs on a 60s design.  Boeing Starliner

A 21st-century evolution of what U-2 pilots and Gemini astronauts wore in the 1960s, the Boeing Blue suit weighs just 12 pounds and is far less bulky than its forebears. It also includes cool features such as cross-trainer-inspired shoes, vents that seal automatically in the case of depressurization, touchscreen-sensitive gloves and a zip-on helmet that plays Star Wars on a loop on the inside of the visor. Oh, all right . . . not really on the Star Wars, though it’s not a bad idea.

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