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A Pristine Lamborghini Huracan Was Blown Up to Create 999 NFTs

On February 25, the charred remains of the 2015 hypercar will go live on the artist’s website as NFTs for 24 hours.

Lamborghini Huracan Shl0ms

Just last month, Italian automaker Lamborghini took its first steps into the NFT marketplace with a series that included five digital artworks. A new batch of non-fungible tokens linked to the marque heads to auction this week, and they come with an explosive backstory.

On February 25th, you’ll be able bid on 888 fragments of a detonated Lamborghini Huracan. The explosion was filmed by a conceptual artist known as Shl0ms as an independent work of art dubbed $CAR. Its sale, and demise, is not affiliated with or endorsed by Lamborghini or others in the Volkswagen Group—as you can imagine. The charred remains of the 2015 chrome-and-black hypercar will go live on the artist’s website as NFTs for 24 hours and must be bought with wETH (wrapped ETH) that allows you to trade directly with Altcoins (a Bitcoin alternative).

Packed with explosives, the vehicle is seen blasting off to the high heavens in a slow-motion video across Shl0ms’ socials. According to Fortune, the process took a team of 100 people to carry out. Working together, the group transported the car to an empty desert, rigged the heat and set-up the cameras on-site. In total, 999 pieces were collected but 111 of those are reserved for “redacted” and the team, Shl0ms shared on Twitter. Each of the parts in the project comes with a video that shows a rotating view of it; those clips have been converted into NFTs with individualized codes.

The goal of the fire show, and all after, is to protest the “greed” surrounding cryptocurrency and NFTs, Fortune relays. Elsewhere, on Motor1, the exercise is referenced as a way to prove the parts are worth more than the entire vehicle. Auto fans are aware that parts like pistons, bearings, suspension arms and more can cost a pretty penny. But as you also know by now, in the metaverse, items often rake in excessively more dough than they do in physical form.

So is this a distasteful, not to mention wasteful, stunt, or a lucrative art project cum pot of gold? A Lamborghini Huracan in good condition could cost up to around $300,000. If the sales top that figure, what’s next? Will they donate the funds to a deserving charity or spin them into another attention-begging stunt? Guess we’ll find out.

Visit Shl0ms’ website for more details on auction taking place February 25.

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