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Quarantined People Are Recreating Famous Artworks Using Household Items, and It’s Glorious

The J. Paul Getty Museum asked its followers to show off their creativity.

The Laundress (La Blanchisseuse), 1761, Jean-Baptiste Greuze. Oil on canvas, 16 x 13 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 83.PA.387. Re-creation on Instagram by Elizabeth Ariza and family in modern-day laundry room Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Instagram

Until last month, you probably had neither the time nor the inclination to recreate a Jeff Koons sculpture out of a pile of old socks. But that was in your previous life. Now that we’re all trying to stave off isolation madness by finding creativity anywhere, including our sock drawers, art lovers with time on their hands have been inundating the social media accounts of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles with recreations of the museum’s art works.

Last week, the museum, which is currently closed due to the Covid-19 crisis, challenged its social media followers to impersonate works of art from the collection using three household items. The challenge, inspired by the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and a Dutch Instagram account, Tussenkunstenquarantaine (which means Between Art and Quarantine), received “countless creative interpretations of iconic artworks”, according to Getty Museum staff.

Irises, 1889, Vincent Van Gogh. Oil on canvas, 29 1/4 × 37 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 90.PA.20. Re-creation via Twitter DM by Cara Jo O’Connell and family using Play Doh, carrot slices, and wooden beads

Irises, 1889, Vincent Van Gogh. Re-creation via Twitter DM by Cara Jo O’Connell and family.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Twitter

Bored, quarantined art enthusiasts have recruited their children, pets, food, laundry and stuffed animals to recreate works from the Getty collection, which ranges from Neolithic clay figurines to contemporary photography and can be searched online here. On Thursday, The J. Paul Getty Trust also announced that it will create a $10 million Covid-19 relief fund to support nonprofit museums in LA.

So if you relish the prospect of recreating El Greco ruffs with coffee filters, 18th-century wigs with toilet rolls, Munch’s The Scream on toast, and Van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear using a banana and a bike helmet, follow the Getty’s twitter account.

Check out more inspired submissions from the challenge below:

Self-Portrait, Yawning, by 1783, Joseph Ducreux. Oil on canvas, 46 3/8 x 35 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.PA.56. Re-creation on Instagram by Paul Morris with British redcoat and twisty towel

Self-Portrait, Yawning, by 1783, Joseph Ducreux. Re-creation on Instagram by Paul Morris.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Instagram

Male Harp Player of the Early Spedos Type, 2700–2300 B.C., Cycladic. Marble, 14 ⅛ x 11 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.AA.103. Recreation via Facebook DM by Irena Ochódzka with canister vacuum

Male Harp Player of the Early Spedos Type, 2700–2300 B.C. Recreation via Facebook DM by Irena Ochódzka.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Facebook

Mantel Clock, about 1785, clock case attributed to Pierre-Philippe Thomire, design attributed to Jean-Guillaume Miotte, clock dials enameled by Henri-François Dubuisson. Gilt and patinated bronze; enameled metal; vert Maurin des Alpes marble; white marble, 21 × 25 1/8 × 9 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 82.DB.2. Re-creation on Twitter by Sandro Alberti with tea and cookies

Mantel Clock, about 1785, clock case attributed to Pierre-Philippe Thomire, design attributed to Jean-Guillaume Miotte, clock dials enameled by Henri-François Dubuisson. Re-creation on Twitter by Sandro Alberti.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Twitter

Laughing Fool, ca. 1500, attributed to Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen. Oil on panel, 13 7/8 in. x 9 1/8 in. Image: Davis Museum at Wellesley College. Recreation via Facebook DM by Tiffanie Pierini Ho with giraffe onesie, Christmas sweater, and post-it

Laughing Fool, ca. 1500, attributed to Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen. Re-creation via Facebook DM by Tiffanie Pierini Ho.  Photo: Davis Museum at Wellesley College; Facebook

Interior with an Easel, Bredgade 25, 1912, Vilhelm Hammershøi. Oil on canvas, 31 × 27 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2018.59. Re-creation via Facebook DM by Tracy McKaskle with picture, pins, easel, and unpainted canvas

Interior with an Easel, Bredgade 25, 1912, Vilhelm Hammershøi. Re-creation via Facebook DM by Tracy McKaskle.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Facebook

Lot and His Daughters, about 1622, Orazio Gentileschi. Oil on canvas, 59 3/4 × 74 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 98.PA.10. Recreation on Twitter by Qie Zhang, Erik Carlsson, and their daughters with sheet and yellow dress

Lot and His Daughters, about 1622, Orazio Gentileschi. Recreation on Twitter by Qie Zhang, Erik Carlsson, and their daughters.  Photo: J. Paul Getty Museum; Twitter

The Astronomer, 1668, Johannes Vermeer. Oil on canvas, 19.6 in. x 17.7 in. Musée du Louvre, Paris. Image: Wikimedia Commons. Recreation on Twitter and via Facebook DM by Ann Zumhagen-Krause and her husband with tray table, blanket, and globe

The Astronomer, 1668, Johannes Vermeer.  Recreation on Twitter and via Facebook DM by Ann Zumhagen-Krause and her husband.  Photo: Wikimedia Commons; Twitter

Imaginary Insect, Tulip, Spider, and Common Pear in Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta, 1561–1562; illumination added about 1591–1596, Joris Hoefnagel, illuminator, and Georg Bocskay, scribe. Watercolors, gold and silver paint, and ink on parchment, 6 9/16 × 4 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 20 (86.MV.527), fol. 25. Re-creation on Twitter by the Martinez family with lasagna, matches, produce, and paper bag

Imaginary Insect, Tulip, Spider, and Common Pear in Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta, 1561–1562.  Re-creation on Twitter by the Martinez family.  Photo:J. Paul Getty Museum; Twitter

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