Everything in This NYC Design Exhibition Is for Sale—Including the $6.5 Million Apartment Hosting It

Known as the Belnord Project, the exhibit was created by frenchCALIFORNIA founder, Guillaume Coutheillas.

If you’ve streamed Only Murders in the Building on Hulu and considered a move to the Belnord, the New York City landmark on which the show’s titular building, the Arconia, is based, this one-stop-shop exhibit may streamline your process.

The Belnord Project is the brainchild of Guillaume Coutheillas, founder of interior design and branding studio frenchCALIFORNIA. Coutheillas flips the traditional approach to real estate on its head by partnering with galleries, artists and developers to introduce their pieces to potential buyers: Everything’s for sale, from the furnishings to the art to the apartment itself.

Everything in the apartment is for sale, including the Jeff Zimmerman Vine chandelier and Ashley Hicks Totem sculpture pictured here.  Courtesy of frenchCalifornia

From a Greta Magnusson Grossman curved sofa in ivory bouclé upholstery to a Renate Müller Universe wool carpet—even a coffee table in brass hex tiles by the Haas Brothers—pieces in the collection (which range in price from $2,500 to $165,000) showcase some of the greatest contemporary designers. The selection was further curated by Evan Snyderman, cofounder of design gallery R & Company.

The Belnord occupies an entire city block on Broadway bordered by West 86th and 87th Streets. The property was recently restored by Robert A. M. Stern Architects, who kept the original floor concepts in mind. frenchCALIFORNIA has fully redesigned Residence 1005, available for $6.47 million, creating a space that “embodies the spirit of the Upper West Side.” The result is a classic layout with contemporary interiors.

frenchCALIFORNIA has fully redesigned Residence 1005, as seen in a room pictured here.  Courtesy of frenchCalifornia

“Rather than the cookie-cutter model apartment, our exhibitions tell a story and allow visitors to have an experience, all while learning about some of the most important designers and artists in history and today,” says Coutheillas. “It was an exciting task to create a space that nods to the architecture and exteriors of the landmarked Belnord building while also appealing to a modern-day buyer or collector.”

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