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This Historic Frank Lloyd Wright Home in LA Is a Designated Cultural Monument. It Can Be Yours for $4.25 Million.

The towering architect constructed the home with 12,000 textured concrete blocks.

Frank Lloyd Wright Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

If you ever wondered what it might be like to live inside an American monument, now’s your chance to find out.

On Wednesday, the Samuel & Harriet Freeman house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Los Angeles hit the market for $4,250,000. With 270-degree views of Hollywood and the LA Basin, the historic home sits on a hill above Highland Boulevard and Franklin Avenue. What makes this Wright property so unique? The architect constructed the 2,884 square-foot residence from 12,000 textured concrete blocks and completed it in 1925 with two bedrooms, one bathroom, a semi-open kitchen and a hearth. As one of only four of Wright’s projects to feature the ornate blocks, the abode’s textile design is exposed on both the exterior and interior.

Frank Lloyd Wright

The interior of the home showcases its specialized cement blocks and eclectic furnishings.  Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

In addition to the property’s multiple outdoor terraces and roof decks, the home offers original furnishings designed exclusively for the house by Rudolf Schindler. Over the years, it has also been given minor nips and tucks from renowned American architects such as John Lautner and Gregory Ain, among others. Today, the house is awaiting restoration, but the residence sits on a 6,802 square-foot lot, which means that you’ll have plenty of space to update the property, if desired. Of course, there may be a few restrictions, as the home is designated a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument and listed within the National Register of Historic Places.

The Hollywood Hills home was originally commissioned by Samuel and Harriet Freeman in 1923 and served as a salon for entertaining. In 1986, the couple donated the property to the University of Southern California. Most recently, architectural historian Kathryn Smith cited the home as one of “Wright’s 20 most important houses.” She called the property a missing link between two World Heritage sites: Taliesan and Fallingwater. “The spatial design, the main room opening through transparent diagonal corners, the unique concrete block detailing, and the bold hillside setting with expansive city views… all create a spectacular expression,” she said.

Frank Lloyd Wright

The light-filled office space within the residence.  Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

For anyone interested in snapping up this historic LA home, the Frank Lloyd Wright Freeman House website offers detailed plans of the main floor, first floor, as well as south and east elevations. Of course, nothing beats an in-person viewing, so prospective buyers can also schedule a showing with Deasy Penner Podley, the real estate firm that holds the listing. To be sure, it would be a monumental purchase.

Check out more images of the Samuel & Harriet Freeman house below.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

Frank Lloyd Wright

Dan Soderberg 1972/Freeman House Photographic Portfolio

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